The only museum in the nation emphasizing art
by women of the African Diaspora
Southeast Debut of New Work by Deborah Roberts at the Spelman College Museum of Fine Art Opens January 2018
Please give to the Spelman College Museum of Fine Art during its 20th anniversary season

Please give to the Spelman College Museum of Fine Art during its 20th anniversary season

2016 has been an exceptional year for the Spelman College Museum of Fine Art. During this season of charitable giving, relive highlights from our 20th anniversary and consider supporting the Museum by making a tax-deductible gift. Your generosity will help...
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Become a Friend of the Museum Today!

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Ingrid Mwangi Robert Hutter

Ingrid Mwangi Robert Hutter (Kenyan-German, b. 1975), “Chameleon,” 2003, 3 C-prints, 39.37 x 31.5 inches (100 x 80 centimeters). Purchased with support from the Friends of the Museum in honor of The 15 x 15 Acquisitions Initiative, 2011.1.a-c

Ingrid Mwangi Robert Hutter (Kenyan-German, b. 1975), Chameleon, 2003, 3 C-prints, 39.37 x 31.5 inches (100 x 80 centimeters). Purchased with support from the Friends of the Museum in honor of The 15 x 15 Acquisitions Initiative, 2011.1.a-c

Chameleon is a triptych that uses the veil as a metaphor for skin that must constantly change and adapt. Vein-like markings seem to move over the contours of the subject’s body with a life of their own, molding themselves to her body like lacy attire: a shawl, long-armed gloves, a corset or a veil. Like a chameleon’s skin that constantly changes in order to adapt, this work positions skin and veils as means of protection. Chameleon is a series of stills taken from Mwangi Hutter’s video of the same title.

Mwangi Hutter were featured in the Museum’s original exhibition, IngridMwangiRobertHutter: Constant Triumph (2011) , which explored how to realize common realities, overcome cultural and social discrimination, avoid violent conflicts, and explore the fragility of the human existence.

Ingrid Mwangi Robert Hutter
Artist Ingrid Mwangi, the daughter of a Kenyan father and German mother, moved from Nairobi to Germany as a teenager. From the early stages of her career, her experience living on two continents and her African-European heritage shaped her media and performance work, which is principally concerned with identity and social conventions. Robert Hutter completed studies in sculpture and painting at Freie Hochschule für Musische und Bildende Künste–Alanus Hochschule in Bonn/Alfter, Germany. Through his multi-media works he examined the broad topic of social justice.

Mwangi and Hutter began working together in the 1970s and in 1975 formed their collaborative in Nairobi Ludwigshafen, an invented location that is a composit of Ludwigshafen, Germany and Nairobi, Kenya, the two cities where they continue to reside today. Mwangi Hutter view their work as a common vision arising from two bodies, two minds, dual histories, and the continuous merging of expression.

Through performance, video, digital photography, and installation, Mwangi Hutter use their bodies and diverse surroundings as sounding boards to create challenging and often difficult work that explores aesthetics, self-knowledge, and universal human experiences. For more information about their work, please see ingridmwangiroberthutter.com.

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