The only museum in the nation emphasizing art
by and about women of the African Diaspora
COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS: Allow Me to Reintroduce Myself . . . And Reintroduce Myself . . . And . . .

COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS: Allow Me to Reintroduce Myself . . . And Reintroduce Myself . . . And . . .

TUESDAY, MAY 13, 2014 5:30 p.m. Multimedia artist Danielle Deadwyler, C’2003, back to the Museum by popular demand, will present a performance-based dialogue on the sexual, social, and personal benefits of “conjuring the other woman.”
BLACK BOX: Gloria Wilson, Center of Gravity: Assimilation, Self-Determination, Resistance, and the Black Art Teacher

BLACK BOX: Gloria Wilson, Center of Gravity: Assimilation, Self-Determination, Resistance, and the Black Art Teacher

THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 2014 6:30 p.m. Gloria Wilson, an artist, researcher, and educator, draws on the fields of cognitive psychology, visual culture, and education to examine how Black art teachers navigate academia and the art world.
Xaviera Simmons: On Process

Xaviera Simmons: On Process

Now on View

Now on View

Renée Stout: Tales of the Conjure Woman is now on view.
Yoga in the Museum

Yoga in the Museum

Mondays 12:00 p.m. Look closely at works of art on view through the lens of balance, focus, and strength; then connect these ideas with a yoga class led by certified yoga instructors Felesha Love, Wellness Specialist, Spelman College, and Makeba...
Become a Friend of the Museum Today!

Become a Friend of the Museum Today!

Please become a Friend of the Museum and help  us continue our tradition of presenting engaging projects that consistently expand art offerings in Atlanta, the region, and beyond. click here  

TalesConjure250 CURRENT EXHIBITION

For many years, Renée Stout has used her alter ego Fatima Mayfield, a fictitious herbalist/fortuneteller, as a vehicle to role-play and confront issues such as romantic relationships, social ills, or financial woes in a way that is open, creative and humorous. Renée Stout: Tales of the Conjure Woman brings together painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, glassblowing, installation, and compelling storytelling. Through an arresting body of works of art, which are intricate and detailed, Stout expresses the magical trait of the conjure woman: the ability to see the world through two sets of eyes — one on the physical realm, the other on the spiritual.

RENEE FINAL from Halsey Institute on Vimeo.

I Can Heal, 2013

6 minutes

Commissioned for the exhibition Renée Stout: Tales of the Conjure Woman

Executive Producer: Mark Sloan
Producer: Brady Welch
Directed by: Colin Sonner & Brady Welch
Cinematography by: Colin Sonner
Edited by: Meghan Sims
Original Score by: Bill Carson
Color Correction by: Evan Kultangwatana
Sound Design by: Roger Middenway
Special thanks to Jim Ross of the Washington Canoe Club & The Hill Family of Cabin Creek Heritage Farm

The film I Can Heal explores the world of Renée Stout by way of Fatima Mayfield, an urban conjure woman created by the artist as an alter-ego and vector. Whether as equal opposites or as corresponding echoes, the relationship between the two is porous and shifting. A number of motifs throughout the film speak to this, most notably the narration, which is conceived as an audio palimpsest of two voices merging and diverging, recalling each other, and “sliding” over the course of a number of incantations, chants, and parables. The passages themselves are taken from the exhibition’s accompanying glossary of conjure terminology, the Bible’s Parable of the Sower, and a lover’s recipe recounted by Zora Neale Hurston in her book Mules and Men.

Funding for this project has been generously provided by Furthermore: a program of the J.M. Kaplan Fund. Additional support was provided by Accola Griefen Gallery in New York City, the Elizabeth Firestone Graham Foundation, Hemphill Fine Arts in Washington, D.C., and Zanatta Contemporary Art / Zanatta Editions in Shawnee, Kansas.